John Banovich

b. 1964, Butte, Montana

 

John Banovich is known internationally for his large, dramatic portrayals of iconic wildlife.  His life-sized elephant painting “Once Upon A Time” drew global attention to ivory poaching and his deep knowledge of wildlife and unwavering commitment to conservation continues to raise awareness about imperiled species.  Under the umbrella of his Banovich Wildscapes Foundation, money generated through artwork sales has been channeled back into support efforts that promote habitat protection, science-based wildlife management and sustainable tourism.  

 

Banovich's work is in important museum, corporate and private collections and has appeared in numerous prestigious venues including the Hiram Blauvelt Art Museum, Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, National Museum of Wildlife Art, Wildlife Experience Art Museum, Salmagundi Club, Museum of the Southwest, Natural History Museum, Gilcrease Museum, traveling exhibitions sponsored by the Society of Animal Artists, Artists for Conservation and showcases hosted by Safari Club International and Dallas Safari Club.  

 

In the press, Banovich’s work has been showcased on Forbes, CBS Entertainment Tonight, The Outdoor Channel, The Great American Country Channel, Orion Entertainment, PBS, Southwest Art Magazine, Western Art Collector Magazine, Cowboys & Indians Magazine, Sporting Classics, Western Art & Architecture, and most recently NBC has written about his dedication to his conservation work and named him an NBC Cause Celebrity.

 

In 2019 through 2020, the Nevada Art Museum and the Witte Museum featured Banovich in a one-man exhibition titled The King of Beasts: A Study of the African Lion.  As an internationally recognized artist who has studied lions for decades, and the Founder of the Lion P.R.I.D.E. Initiative, the body of work created for this exhibition serves as an homage to these animals and explores questions about mankind’s deep fear, love, and admiration for these creatures. The exhibition spans nearly twenty-five years of work and assembles Banovich’s body of work focused on African Lions for the very first time. As the plight of the African Lion has been prominently featured across media platforms recently, the cultural significance of Panthera leo could not be timelier.